Resources

Explore the links and resources below to learn how to create multimedia elements for your story. Maps (when location is important) To make a Google map, you need a Google account. So make sure you have one. Ready? Follow Google’s instructions on how to make a map with My Maps. The steps explain how to add placemarks, […]

Explore the links and resources below to learn how to create multimedia elements for your story.

Maps (when location is important)

To make a Google map, you need a Google account. So make sure you have one.

Ready? Follow Google’s instructions on how to make a map with My Maps. The steps explain how to add placemarks, lines and shapes. You can also style the elements on your map by changing the colour, for example.

When you’re done, click the green Share button in the top right corner and change the setting so that your map is Public on the Web. Look at the top left corner and click the folder icon. Choose “embed on my site” and grab the embed code. You’ll need that to add to your story.

Here’s an example of a map. This one shows the four universities in Halifax’s south end and downtown.

Timelines (when dates are important)

Now that you have a Google account, you can build a Timeline JS. Use their dummy Google spreadsheet to get started and replace their content with your own. Follow the steps on the Timeline JS website. Just like with Google maps, you need the embed code for your KJR story, so don’t forget that.

Here’s the official how-to video from the good folks at Timeline JS:

Charts (when numbers/statistics are important)

You can use Google to make charts. Datawrapper is also a useful tool because it was specifically created for journalists. There’s a tutorial to follow if you get stuck.

And for funkier visuals, try Infogram. It’s a good tool to use IF it fits the tone of your piece.

All three options are free. The important thing when making any infographic, however, is that you work with clean data and always mention the source.

Interactive image (when a photo needs some explaining)

You can use a tool like ThingLink to add some interactivity to a photo. You can include text, video and audio — other content that you layer on top of your image.

Here’s an example of what the Chronicle Herald did regarding election spending in last year’s provincial election.

Video (when you need to show action, demonstrate something, show character)

Many of you have taken Jour 3005 — Intro to Broadcast Journalism. For those who need a refresher on Adobe Premiere, you can find a tutorial on the official Adobe website.

If you’re new to video, you can record on your iPhone or iPod Touch, trim the top and tail right on the device, and upload to YouTube. This tutorial explains the steps. NOTE: You will want to upload to your own YouTube account.

Remember, always shoot horizontal, never vertical.

Audio (when you need to show character, emotion, and/or focus on an anecdote)

If you’ve met Doug Kirkaldy and Mark Pineo, you’re an audiophile already. Mark created this handy guide on multitrack editing in Adobe Audition.

Click the image below for a larger view.

MultiTrack in Audition pt2